Data Quid Pro Quo

The past year was marked by yet more troubling headlines about data leaks and other privacy-related tomfoolery. In 2019, expect to see greater scrutiny of how brands collect and manipulate the troves of personal data we’re all creating and often unknowingly sharing accompanied by a growing demand for more control of this data footprint. Consumers are rethinking the value exchange that has previously seen many of us willingly sacrificing privacy for convenience. They will demand more agency over their digital personas, and brands will need to respond with greater transparency around what and how much data they’re collecting at what financial gain to the brand.

Manifestations

LunaDNA, a new health platform, has created a novel way to reimburse consumers who are willing to share their DNA data with researchers. Members of the community are rewarded with shares in the firm when they provide their genetic test results and other health- and diet-related information.​

Spotify’s year-end Wrapped feature, which packages its users listening habits into a fascinating, personalized reflection on your individual year of music listening, remains a great example of how to serve back digital data in a way that’s both immensely fun and lacking in the creepy factor that consumers are increasingly wary of. ​

Apps like Killi and Digi.me are now rewarding consumers for the right to collect specific types of data that they then provide to marketers. The value proposition is meant to be transparent and mutually beneficial.​

LunaDNA, a new health platform, has created a novel way to reimburse consumers who are willing to share their DNA data with researchers. Members of the community are rewarded with shares in the firm when they provide their genetic test results and other health- and diet-related information.​

Spotify’s year-end Wrapped feature, which packages its users listening habits into a fascinating, personalized reflection on your individual year of music listening, remains a great example of how to serve back digital data in a way that’s both immensely fun and lacking in the creepy factor that consumers are increasingly wary of. ​

Apps like Killi and Digi.me are now rewarding consumers for the right to collect specific types of data that they then provide to marketers. The value proposition is meant to be transparent and mutually beneficial.​

implications

In order to avoid abusing consumer trust, carefully consider how you and your marketing partners are using potentially invasive data techniques like mobile location and facial recognition. Communicate the value to your consumers in clear and simple terms. And prepare for increased regulation with California’s new Data Privacy Act a bellwether for the rest of the country.​